The 17 Things

Living close to a vibrant community with local produce, community gardens, well maintained bikeways and walkways helps reduce the costs of transport and is great for your health too!

No 2. Living Locally

0The 17 Things

What Is it?

Many more people are wanting to live in a community that is vibrant and full of activities and opportunities to connect with the environment and with each other. Many residents are working with local councils to create these rich community experiences with initiatives such as community gardens, local produce markets and bikeways and walkways. This growing trend towards encouraging a village feeling even within urban environments, to be closer to cafes, markets, cultural events and green spaces is also impacting where people want to buy or rent homes.

How will it help me reduce my running costs and increase my comfort?

Having a home near a well-established and thriving community means you can easily and cost effectively engage in activities close to home, and take advantage of fresh food and local amenities. Living locally offers you much much more than the age-old property marketing mantra “location, location” and “close to shops and transport” and it’s impacting the way people choose properties.

Local community gardens and bikeways, cafes and places where people gather and relax provide lots of opportunities to get outdoors and be active; farmers markets enable people access to fruit and vegetables that haven’t been stored and refrigerated or transported long distances. Cultural and art festivals and events foster connections between people which is good for our sense of wellbeing.

When these resources are close to home you’re able to drive less and take public transport, walk or cycle more, which is important for your health and helps you to reduce costs on transport.

Bikes and walking are a healthy alternative to driving or catching public transport.  Your local council may have a map of the recommended walking or bike paths. There may even be bike storage spaces in your local area.

What professional should I talk to about this?

With a quick web search of your local council, you can get familiar with what’s already available in your local community and connect to what interests you. Local creative, social or cultural groups, even city farms and rooftop gardens and gatherings are often promoted in local cafe or libraries or community center notice boards and on your local council website. If you can’t find what you want then why not be an ‘influencer’ and get your idea off the ground yourself. For example, see our post on setting up your own community garden.

Even city councils with large commercial centers and limited space are co-creating their spaces with local residents to create a great community vibe.

Fremantle Markets

Fremantle Markets, WA.

A great example of councils who are “activating” their communities and who foster, value and support a vital and rich community experience are:

The 20 minute city: This is a policy initiative of the Bus Industry Confederation which is proposing a “20 minute city” where “most people are able to undertake most activities needed for a good life within a 20 minute walk, cycle or public transport trip from where they live … Flow on effects will include lower traffic congestion levels, improved health outcomes, lower accident costs, reduced emissions (greenhouse gases and air pollutants) and greater social inclusion”.

The 10 minute city:  The City of Ballarat community, with its 10 minute city vision is seeking to maintain existing levels of access to destinations and services even when the city grows over time.

Walkable cities: In 2007 Walk Score was created to help people find walkable places to live and work. Now cities and towns in the Australia are ranked on their walk score. A walkable neighborhood offers a “happier, healthier and more sustainable lifestyle with access to public transit, better commutes, and proximity to the people and places you love”.

The Green Building Council of Australia has developed the Green Star – Communities rating tool to help planners, designers and developers to create sustainable precincts, neighbourhoods and communities. The Green Star – Communities rating tool is currently in pilot and rates the “plan for development” to deliver a place which will provide an environment in which people can live and work sustainably.

Is there anything I need to know before I meet with them?

Just reflect on what you’d personally like from your community and begin your research from there. The exciting thing is starting the conversation.

What is the price range I can expect?

Most council initiatives such as community classes are free and available for all ages. Bikeways and well-maintained walkways are, of course, open for public access. Community garden and markets are also generally available to the public for free. However, there are some gardens that are private for members only.

For other local events, classes and workshops, it is best to contact the organisers direct for specific prices.

Where can I find more information?

The best place to start is your local council website for what’s available in your area. You can then branch your search more specifically. Check the local council website for information on local community gardens, markets, events, public transport best suited for the area and bike paths maps. Contact your local council direct for any specific questions.

To find a community garden near you: Australian City Farms and Community Gardens Network. 

Community short courses: Veggie gardens, cookery and more; check our our guide to the short courses in your state supplied by WeTeachMe.

If I already have this feature, is there anything I need to know about using it effectively?

Connect with your local community by engaging in events, community gardens or classes that you find interesting.

If you own a bike, Liveability’s tips and how-to videos on All Things Bikes show you how to easily maintain your bike at home so that you can ride comfortably on the bike paths in your area.

Does this work better when combined with any of the other 17 Things™

Living locally is about being connected to a vibrant community. It can be achieved on its own without the other 17 Things™ but will add to a better experience of living in the home when combined with other 17 Things™.

Will this feature be recognised when I sell my property?

Yes; Liveability Real Estate Specialist sales agents and property managers have been upskilled to identify an additional 17 Things™ on top of a standard property appraisal. So if you have invested in any of the 17 Things™ this means your property will be appraised and marketed with real skill and with the best marketing resources for online and print media.

You can book a free property appraisal with a Liveability Real Estate Specialist any time you’re ready to sell or even if you’re not planning to sell for a couple of years. Each of the 17 Things™ has appraisal benchmarks (relevant to existing and new homes) which have been set by relevant industry partners to make sure we deliver a high standard of property marketing. So your Liveability Real Estate Specialist will work through this appraisal checklist with you as they move through your home. It’s a great chance for you to let them know about all the property features you have invested in.


Any questions?

We’re here to help! Just send us your enquiry.

What Is it?

Many more people are wanting to live in a community that is vibrant and full of activities and opportunities to connect with the environment and with each other. Many residents are working with local councils to create these rich community experiences with initiatives such as community gardens, local produce markets and bikeways and walkways. This growing trend towards encouraging a village feeling even within urban environments, to be closer to cafes, markets, cultural events and green spaces is also impacting where people want to buy or rent homes.

How will it help me reduce my running costs and increase my comfort?

Having a home near a well-established and thriving community means you can easily and cost effectively engage in activities close to home, and take advantage of fresh food and local amenities. Living locally offers you much much more than the age-old property marketing mantra “location, location” and “close to shops and transport” and it’s impacting the way people choose properties.

Local community gardens and bikeways, cafes and places where people gather and relax provide lots of opportunities to get outdoors and be active; farmers markets enable people access to fruit and vegetables that haven’t been stored and refrigerated or transported long distances. Cultural and art festivals and events foster connections between people which is good for our sense of wellbeing.

When these resources are close to home you’re able to drive less and take public transport, walk or cycle more, which is important for your health and helps you to reduce costs on transport.

Bikes and walking are a healthy alternative to driving or catching public transport.  Your local council may have a map of the recommended walking or bike paths. There may even be bike storage spaces in your local area.

What professional should I talk to about this?

With a quick web search of your local council, you can get familiar with what’s already available in your local community and connect to what interests you. Local creative, social or cultural groups, even city farms and rooftop gardens and gatherings are often promoted in local cafe or libraries or community center notice boards and on your local council website. If you can’t find what you want then why not be an ‘influencer’ and get your idea off the ground yourself. For example, see our post on setting up your own community garden.

Even city councils with large commercial centers and limited space are co-creating their spaces with local residents to create a great community vibe.

Fremantle Markets

Fremantle Markets, WA.

A great example of councils who are “activating” their communities and who foster, value and support a vital and rich community experience are:

The 20 minute city: This is a policy initiative of the Bus Industry Confederation which is proposing a “20 minute city” where “most people are able to undertake most activities needed for a good life within a 20 minute walk, cycle or public transport trip from where they live … Flow on effects will include lower traffic congestion levels, improved health outcomes, lower accident costs, reduced emissions (greenhouse gases and air pollutants) and greater social inclusion”.

The 10 minute city:  The City of Ballarat community, with its 10 minute city vision is seeking to maintain existing levels of access to destinations and services even when the city grows over time.

Walkable cities: In 2007 Walk Score was created to help people find walkable places to live and work. Now cities and towns in the Australia are ranked on their walk score. A walkable neighborhood offers a “happier, healthier and more sustainable lifestyle with access to public transit, better commutes, and proximity to the people and places you love”.

The Green Building Council of Australia has developed the Green Star – Communities rating tool to help planners, designers and developers to create sustainable precincts, neighbourhoods and communities. The Green Star – Communities rating tool is currently in pilot and rates the “plan for development” to deliver a place which will provide an environment in which people can live and work sustainably.

Is there anything I need to know before I meet with them?

Just reflect on what you’d personally like from your community and begin your research from there. The exciting thing is starting the conversation.

What is the price range I can expect?

Most council initiatives such as community classes are free and available for all ages. Bikeways and well-maintained walkways are, of course, open for public access. Community garden and markets are also generally available to the public for free. However, there are some gardens that are private for members only.

For other local events, classes and workshops, it is best to contact the organisers direct for specific prices.

Where can I find more information?

The best place to start is your local council website for what’s available in your area. You can then branch your search more specifically. Check the local council website for information on local community gardens, markets, events, public transport best suited for the area and bike paths maps. Contact your local council direct for any specific questions.

To find a community garden near you: Australian City Farms and Community Gardens Network. 

Community short courses: Veggie gardens, cookery and more; check our our guide to the short courses in your state supplied by WeTeachMe.

If I already have this feature, is there anything I need to know about using it effectively?

Connect with your local community by engaging in events, community gardens or classes that you find interesting.

If you own a bike, Liveability’s tips and how-to videos on All Things Bikes show you how to easily maintain your bike at home so that you can ride comfortably on the bike paths in your area.

Does this work better when combined with any of the other 17 Things™

Living locally is about being connected to a vibrant community. It can be achieved on its own without the other 17 Things™ but will add to a better experience of living in the home when combined with other 17 Things™.

Will this feature be recognised when I sell my property?

Yes; Liveability Real Estate Specialist sales agents and property managers have been upskilled to identify an additional 17 Things™ on top of a standard property appraisal. So if you have invested in any of the 17 Things™ this means your property will be appraised and marketed with real skill and with the best marketing resources for online and print media.

You can book a free property appraisal with a Liveability Real Estate Specialist any time you’re ready to sell or even if you’re not planning to sell for a couple of years. Each of the 17 Things™ has appraisal benchmarks (relevant to existing and new homes) which have been set by relevant industry partners to make sure we deliver a high standard of property marketing. So your Liveability Real Estate Specialist will work through this appraisal checklist with you as they move through your home. It’s a great chance for you to let them know about all the property features you have invested in.


Any questions?

We’re here to help! Just send us your enquiry.

The 17 Things

The 17 Things

The 17 Things™ are property features that have the potential to reduce running costs and increase comfort if used correctly. You can discuss incorporating these into your renovation with with your architect, building designer or builder. The real estate industry is now identifying these Liveability Property Features™at point of sale or rent through agents that have completed additional training as Liveability Real Estate Specialists.

Comments are closed.