Live Well in Your Home

Renters too can find many simple, inexpensive ways to reduce a rental home’s energy and water use which range from the simplest tweaks to improvements that may require permission from your landlord.

Working with Your Landlord or Property Manager

Centre for Liveability Real Estate

How you use your house is important.

You don’t have to own your property to save money and increase your comfort at home and reduce your environmental impact. Renters too can find many simple, inexpensive ways to reduce a rental home’s energy and water use.

If your property manager is a trained Liveability Real Estate Specialist then they will be familiar with solutions to improve the running cost and comfort potential of the property and they are able to support both you and your landlord with regard to these requests.

In this section of our website “Home- A Users Guide” we have the tips for each room of the house which range from the simplest tweaks to improvements that may require permission from your landlord.

To make it easier to identify the difference, throughout this section of the website where we provide specific room tips, we have identified, with the following statement, when you will need to ask your landlord’s permission to make a particular change:

“A note for renters: you will need your landlords permission for this change.”

You can also download the whole FREE Rent Smart Guide from our guides section

Before you undertake any alterations to a rental property.

Working with Your Landlord and Property Investment Manager

You need to work together with your landlord or property manager to reach agreement on any upgrades that will reduce ongoing running cost potential and the environmental impact of your rental property. So, before contacting your landlord or property manager, it’s a good idea to research state and federal government tax deductions and rebates for improvements on the energy or water efficiency of your rental property.

If you are renting through a real estate agent make an appointment with them to discuss your ideas about how to improve their property.

Alternatively you could write to your property investment manager or landlord using the letter template supplied.

Download the letter template here.

Legislation covering residential renting

Each state and territory has legislation that regulates residential tenancies. Generally, for any changes you wish to make to the rental property you must receive permission, often in writing, from your landlord.

Before you make any changes, you should agree with your landlord as to who will pay the costs and what will happen to any fixture you add at the end of the tenancy. Make sure this is recorded in writing. You will need to check your own lease document for the requirements relating to your tenancy. If you have no lease then check with your landlord.

Additional information about legislation and rules relating to renting residential property in your particular country, state or territory can be found on the websites of various authorities depending on the state or country where the property you are renting is located.

Here are some links for you to follow:

Please ask your property manager if you have any specific questions.

Centre for Liveability Real Estate

Centre for Liveability Real Estate

In addition to their expertise in residential real estate, The Centre for Liveability Real Estate also works collaboratively with the sustainable design, construction, manufacturing and assessment and industries in the development of information on this site.

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