Wholefood Recipes by Holly Davis

Baked Pumpkins Stuffed with Toasted Millet, Corn, Chestnuts, Walnuts and Ginger

A little note about millet

Millet is a tiny yellow grain, rich in heart-protective magnesium and other important nutrients: copper, manganese and phosphorus. Unhulled it is best used as birdseed but hulled millet can be soaked and cooked into a delicious creamy porridge or toasted and cooked like this, which results in a light fluffy texture with a delicious nutty flavour. Be sure to add the boiling stock to hot, well-toasted grains and beware the steam that issues forth when you do this.

chestnuts on the treePreparing chestnuts

Fresh chestnuts and walnuts grow together and both are available through the autumn months. You can find a farm to pick your own or buy them both from grocery shops. They take a little work but the effort is well rewarded with delicious flavours and textures.

If you would prefer pre-prepared walnuts and chestnuts, dried walnuts are available from health food shops and supermarkets and chestnuts can be bought dried or frozen in Asian supermarkets and good delis.

Buying and storing: Look for shiny, firm chestnuts that feel heavy for their size. Keep them in a cloth or mesh bag in the crisper section in the fridge, for up to two weeks.

Chestnuts fresh & before & after peelingCooking: Take each chestnut and carefully make a slit from top to bottom down the curved side – these are now ready to bake in the residual coals of a fire or in a heavy pan for approximately 10 minutes, depending on their size They will soften and the skin will burst.

Alternatively, you can parboil them: place scored chestnuts in a small saucepan and cover in cold water. Bring to a simmer and simmer for 15–20 minutes

Peeling: Remove from the oven or saucepan and allow to cool enough to handle. Take a small knife and peel both layers of skin from the chestnuts.

The outer skin will come away easily; the inner skin may come away easily, but if not cook for a further 5–10 minutes and then peel them. They are now ready to use in your recipe or you can bag them and freeze for later use.

Baked Pumpkins Stuffed with Toasted Millet, Corn, Chestnuts, Walnuts and Ginger
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Autumn is for getting cosy and this dish delivers cosy beautifully. Sweet nugget pumpkins filled with a delicious millet stuffing. Millet is a tiny yellow grain, rich in heart-protective magnesium and other important nutrients.
Baked Pumpkins Stuffed with Toasted Millet, Corn, Chestnuts, Walnuts and Ginger
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Autumn is for getting cosy and this dish delivers cosy beautifully. Sweet nugget pumpkins filled with a delicious millet stuffing. Millet is a tiny yellow grain, rich in heart-protective magnesium and other important nutrients.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time
4people 30minutes 40minutes
Servings Prep Time
4people 30minutes
Cook Time
40minutes
Ingredients
Servings: people
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
    To peel and par cook chestnuts
    1. Place the scored chestnuts in a small pan and cover in cold water. Bring to a simmer and simmer for 15-20 minutes. Remove from the pan and allow to cool enough to handle. Take a small knife and peel both layers of skin from the chestnuts.
    2. The outer skin will come away easily, the inner skin may come away easily, if not re simmer for a further 5-10 minutes and then peel them. They are now ready to use in your recipe or you can bag them and freeze for later use.
    Stuffed Baked Pumpkins
    1. Heat a deep frying pan and add half the oil. Toast the millet, stirring using a wooden spoon. Keep it moving until the millet is evenly, lightly toasted and nutty smelling (approximately 10 minutes). Set the millet aside and wipe out the pan.
    2. In a separate pot, bring the stock to a simmer.
    3. Reheat the frying pan and add the remaining fat or oil.
    4. Sauté the leeks until softened and then add the corn kernels.
    5. Toss in the toasted millet and stir until it is very hot again.
    6. Pour the hot stock into the pan, being very careful to avoid the steam created.
    7. Add the chestnuts, ginger and half the walnuts. Stir to combine and cover with a tight-fitting lid.
    8. Place on a diffuser and turn the heat to low.
    9. Cook for 30 minutes then turn off the heat but leave the lid on for a further 10 minutes.
    10. Meanwhile, cut the tops off the pumpkins to make ‘lids’ and scoop out the seeds.
    11. Steam the pumpkins and their lids until just tender; test with a small sharp knife.
    12. Open the millet pot and stir gently to combine; the grains should be fluffy.
    13. Fill each pumpkin with the millet and top with extra walnuts, tahini sauce (see below), chopped flat leaf parsley and lemon zest.
    14. The extra filling is delicious as a light meal or side dish if you have any left over.
    The tahini sauce
    1. Combine the first 4 ingredients in a cup or bowl. Whisk in the boiled water until the mix is a thin smooth cream. The mix thickens as it cools.

    Sources:

    • Image credits to © Holly Davis
    Holly Davis

    Holly Davis

    Holly weaves together the colours, tastes and textures of carefully chosen ingredients to create food that nourishes the body and soul. For thirteen years Holly delighted the dedicated customers of the respected Sydney Iku Wholefood restaurants with her inspiring blend of traditional Asian and European flavours. She is author of the best-selling book on wholefood cooking Nourish and lives at Whale Beach on Sydney’s northern beaches. Through her business Food by Holly Davis she caters, contributes regularly to magazines and conducts cooking classes all over Australia which are a celebration of her knowledge of and passion for delicious food. We’re excited she’s joined the Liveability team and we always look forward with anticipations to her recipes every month.

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