Wholefood Recipes by Holly Davis
Juniper, Orange and Fennel Cured Fish
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
The fresh combination of sweet and complex flavours in this recipe delivers a perfect summer savoury experience. You can use this cured fish (this recipe uses Bonito) in much the same way that you might use gravlax or smoked salmon. It tastes wonderful on it's own with mustard sauce or here we have it on canapes with finely sliced cucumber and radishes.
Juniper, Orange and Fennel Cured Fish
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
The fresh combination of sweet and complex flavours in this recipe delivers a perfect summer savoury experience. You can use this cured fish (this recipe uses Bonito) in much the same way that you might use gravlax or smoked salmon. It tastes wonderful on it's own with mustard sauce or here we have it on canapes with finely sliced cucumber and radishes.
Servings Prep Time Passive Time
8people depending on how it is served 15 minutes or 25 minutes if you are skinning and boning 24–48 hours Time to cure the fish
Servings Prep Time
8people depending on how it is served 15 minutes or 25 minutes if you are skinning and boning
Passive Time
24–48 hours Time to cure the fish
Ingredients
Servings: people depending on how it is served
Ingredients
Servings: people depending on how it is served
Instructions
To make the cure for the fish
  1. Combine the juniper berries, coriander, peppercorns and bay leaves in a mortar and pound to crack and semi-crush the mix.
  2. Add the orange zest, ginger and fennel along with the brown sugar and salt and grind together. Set aside while you prepare the fish.
To prepare the fish
  1. To skin the fish, take a very sharp knife and holding a fillet at the tail end cut down to the skin and then run the knife towards the head while gently but firmly pulling the skin against the blade.
  2. To remove the bones run your knife down either side of the centre line and cut through. (You can add these bones to the stock.) You will now have 4 clean fillets.
  3. Sprinkle a little of the cure on the base of a deep flat plate.
  4. Place the fish fillets on top and nestle them close together.
  5. Firmly pat the rest of the cure over the surface of the fish.
  6. Cover with a piece of parchment paper and then wrap with plastic wrap or a clean dry length of fabric.
  7. Place in the fridge and turn the fish over every 12 hours, until it is the texture you like; the cure draws moisture from the fish – the longer it cures the drier and saltier it becomes. I suggest trying at 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours, to see what you like best.
  8. Wipe the fish to remove the cure and set aside the liquid to use in the mustard sauce. (see recipe below)
Serving suggestion - Canapes (pictured)
  1. Rub cucumber rounds with the salt; set aside.
  2. Slice the bonito 1cm thick on a diagonal.
  3. Place the cucumber rounds on a serving platter
  4. Top each round with a piece of fish and then a few pieces of beetroot. Scatter the edible flowers over the platter.
  5. Serve with a small daub of mustard sauce (instructions follow) and a fennel flower.
To make the mustard sauce
  1. Combine all ingredients except the oil.
  2. Pour in the oil slowly, stirring constantly to form an emulsion. Store airtight in the fridge for up to a week
  3. Makes 9–15 pieces Time to prep: 15 minutes
Recipe Notes

Serving Suggestions

You can also serve this cured fish with poached eggs for breakfast, served on rye crispbread with finely sliced cucumber and radishes, or chopped in chunky jewels in a salad.

Sustainable Fish

If you love tuna but recognise that it is no longer a sustainable option, try Bonito. Bonito are in the same family and offer a similar texture and flavour. These fish are a great deal smaller and a whole lot cheaper than tuna at $15–$20 per kilo compared to $60–$70. Serving fish that are not endangered will also make for a more enjoyable repast.

Credits

Marble Platter courtesy of The Lost and Found Department
Shop 81 Dickson Avenue, Artarmon, NSW

Sources:

  • Image credits to © Holly Davis
Holly Davis

Holly Davis

Holly weaves together the colours, tastes and textures of carefully chosen ingredients to create food that nourishes the body and soul. For thirteen years Holly delighted the dedicated customers of the respected Sydney Iku Wholefood restaurants with her inspiring blend of traditional Asian and European flavours. She is author of the best-selling book on wholefood cooking Nourish and lives at Whale Beach on Sydney’s northern beaches. Through her business Food by Holly Davis she caters, contributes regularly to magazines and conducts cooking classes all over Australia which are a celebration of her knowledge of and passion for delicious food. We’re excited she’s joined the Liveability team and we always look forward with anticipations to her recipes every month.

Leave a Reply