Wholefood Recipes by Holly Davis
Snake beans and asparagus with wild rice, beluga lentil and black-eyed peas
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Green is the colour associated with this glorious season and this easy-to-make salad provides abundant colour, nutrients and flavours. Vary the grains, beans, legumes and vegetables to suit what is available and abundantly in season.
Snake beans and asparagus with wild rice, beluga lentil and black-eyed peas
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Print Recipe
Green is the colour associated with this glorious season and this easy-to-make salad provides abundant colour, nutrients and flavours. Vary the grains, beans, legumes and vegetables to suit what is available and abundantly in season.
Servings Prep Time Cook Time Passive Time
6people 20minutes 35 minutes(for beans and grains) 6-8hours
Servings Prep Time
6people 20minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35 minutes(for beans and grains) 6-8hours
Ingredients
Servings: people
Ingredients
Servings: people
Instructions
  1. In a serving bowl combine the wild rice with the beluga lentils and the black-eyed peas
  2. Cut the asparagus and snake beans on a diagonal into bite-size irregular shapes.
  3. Finely chop the rosemary and finely slice the garlic, crack the pepper and combine with a good pinch of coarse salt.
  4. Boil a pot of salted water and blanch the asparagus and snake beans until just tender. Strain and run under cold water, until the vegetables are cold; drain well. Add these to the serving dish then add the seasoning.
  5. Gently toss the ingredients in the serving dish together. Drizzle with olive oil; adjust seasonings to your taste. If using, add the goat cheese, broken into small chunks.
  6. Serve as a light lunch or as a side dish to grilled fish or lamb.
Recipe Notes

You might like to prepare a pot of grains, beans and legumes in advance to make putting this salad together even easier.

When stored airtight, in the fridge, these will keep for 5 days; to be utilised in as many ways as you can imagine. Try adding some wild rice and beluga lentils and/or black-eyed peas into a good stock with some leafy greens for a speedy, light and nourishing soup; or stir-fry them together with some olive oil or ghee and thinly sliced green beans, zucchini and broad beans – the possibilities are endless.

Nature has protected its grains, legumes and beans with digestive inhibitors so that they can pass through a bird or animal’s digestive system and still sprout and grow. For optimum digestibility and greater nutrient value from beans, legumes and grains, follow these simple guidelines. I generally soak what I need the evening before I intend to cook them.

Preparing and Cooking Beans and Legumes

  1. Measure the amount required.
  2. Pour them into a bowl or pot and pick out any small rocks and discoloured beans.
  3. Rinse well under cold, running water.
  4. Soak lentils and small quick cooking beans, covered by 3cm of tepid water to which you have added 1 tablespoon lemon juice, for 4–6 hours.
  5. Soak the larger kidney-shaped varieties with a small pinch of bicarbonate of soda or small teaspoon of kelp powder (Tasmanian kelp is now available in health food stores), for 8–12 hours, loosely covered on the kitchen bench.
  6. Discard the soaking water and rinse well.
  7. Cover with fresh cold water but do not add any form of salt as this inhibits beans from softening.
  8. Bring to a boil, uncovered.
  9. Skim off any scum/foam that rises to the surface and discard.
  10. Once the beans have stopped producing scum add ½ a teaspoon of kelp sea vegetable, which will add minerals and flavour and assist beans in softening.
  11. Continue to simmer until all beans are tender.
  12. Uncooked beans are best discarded as they taste awful and may adversely affect digestion.

Tips

Keep covered with water during the entire cooking time.
Do not leave out of the fridge, as once cooked, beans and legumes will easily ferment.

Preparing and Cooking Grains

Grains are a delightful component of a meal if done well. If not well cooked they can be very dull and hard work to both eat and digest.

  1. Sort before soaking and remove any rocks or stones.
  2. Wash whole grains to remove dirt and any husks that may have lingered longer.
  3. Cover with tepid water and add 1 tablespoon of lemon juice; soak 6–12 hours
  4. Drain and cover in fresh cold water according to your recipe.
  5. Add sea salt at the beginning of cooking; this helps the grain to fully absorb the liquid and contributes to a sweet full flavor.
  6. Use a pot with a tight-fitting lid and do not disturb during cooking unless the recipe asks you to.
  7. If you are dry roasting the grain do so mindfully; keep your full awareness on the grain so it is evenly roasted. Do this step carefully and the result is a delicious flavour and even cooking.
  8. When dry roasting grain use boiling stock or water. Be very careful that your hands and face are not over the pot when you add the liquid as steam burns are dreadfully painful.
  9. Mildly scorched grain (golden grains, not burnt!) from the base of the pot make the basis of a lovely soup or porridge.
Holly Davis

Holly Davis

Holly weaves together the colours, tastes and textures of carefully chosen ingredients to create food that nourishes the body and soul. For thirteen years Holly delighted the dedicated customers of the respected Sydney Iku Wholefood restaurants with her inspiring blend of traditional Asian and European flavours. She is author of the best-selling book on wholefood cooking Nourish and lives at Whale Beach on Sydney’s northern beaches. Through her business Food by Holly Davis she caters, contributes regularly to magazines and conducts cooking classes all over Australia which are a celebration of her knowledge of and passion for delicious food. We’re excited she’s joined the Liveability team and we always look forward with anticipations to her recipes every month.

Leave a Reply